Book Review: The First and Last Freedom by J. Krishnamurti (I/II)

The First and Last Freedom by J. Krishnamurti is one of the most profound works that I have ever come across after Vivekananda. I have always been intrigued with relationship between thinker and thought. To some extent, I think, after reading this book, I have come close to the understanding of the mind’s duality, of course in terms of thinker and thought.

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Skin-Integrated Electronics to Capture Haptic Feedback: Human-Machine Interfaces

To control a remote robot via electromechanical devices, require the operator to wear huge and at times bulky gear. To make things easier, researchers from Hong Kong and China have fabricated a flexible skin patch, which has an ability to provide haptic feedback. Now not only the user can receive feedback from another (human) user but also from a robot to be more specific, haptic feedback from remotely controlled robot.

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Huge Gas Planet Hidden in Plain Sight: TOI-2180 b

Hunt for a new stellar body is always on. Space is full of astronomical bodies and star gazers continuously search for new stars and planets into the known realm of humanity. In one such effort, an astronomer at University of California, Riverside in collaboration with a group of citizen scientists have spot a huge gas planet. The newly discovered body is otherwise hidden from view by typical stargazing tools.

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DNA Mutations are Not Random: Genetics Challenges Evolutionary Theory

Plant evolves to protect itself, there is no random mutation at DNA level. In a collaborative effort, researchers from University of California, Davis, and the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Germany concluded that when it comes to mutations, there is no such thing as randomness. In fact, it is in a non-random way that benefits the plant, claimed Grey Monroe, an assistant professor in the UC Davis Department of Plant Sciences.

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Stellar Streams’ Trajectory Reveals the Dark Matter: Mysterious Universe

Understanding the properties of dark matter is the most important quest for astronomers. Many have dedicated their years to research just to take a sneak peek into what actually comprises of dark matter. In a recent research, astronomers have detected twelve streams of stars spiralling within the outermost region of our galaxy.

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Book Review: Sapiens, A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari

Homosapiens a.k.a we humans are the dominant specie today because we can create mythologies and tell stories. Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari is an interesting read, where the author interweaves science and the humanities together to make us see where we have reached today from once being the hunter gatherers.

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Venus could be a Life-bearing Planet: Space Exploration

Space scientists have always looked up to our closest planet neighbour and wondered what if there is life on Venus. Sanjay Limaye, from University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science also an expert on Venus says that in the coming decade in a collective effort, astronomers all across the globe will make case for exploring the “evening star”. With an experience of over 45 years, Limaye’s core investigation is the planet’s dense atmosphere.

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Interview: Takashi Ozaki, Research Scientist at Toyota Central R&D Labs, Japan

Takashi Ozaki is the frontier research leader at Beyond-X Research Domain, Toyota Central R&D Labs. Inc. Japan. He completed his B.E. and M.E. from Kyoto University. His area of research fields includes – bioinspired actuators and robotics, micro electromechanical systems and microfabrication processes.  

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Book Review: Physics of The Future by Dr Michio Kaku

Physics of The Future is my second read from Dr. Michio Kaku, first being The Future of Humanity. For the current book, Dr. Kaku interviewed more than 300 scientists along with their research that would lead humanity to the next level in computers, medicine, nanotechnology, space exploration and energy production.

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