The Quantum Moment by Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharff Goldhaber

The Quantum Moment – How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty by Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharff Goldhaber is one of the most fascinatingly informative books I have read so far. I have recently developed interest in the world of quantum and I find this book fully satiated my curiosity. It is beautifully written for a beginner like me.

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The Fourteen Dalai Lamas by Glenn H. Mullin

The Fourteen Dalai Lamas: A Sacred Legacy of Reincarnation by Glenn H. Mullin takes us back into the Tibetan history soaked up with their culture and times during the wars within and pressure from the outside of the country. It is not a fast read, after all, we are peeping at the history of Tibet, which of course would take time and imagination to witness the era. The work can be considered as a collarge depicting the lives and times of Dalai Lamas.

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Being and Time by Martin Heidegger

Being and Time by Martin Heidegger is an ocean of infinite gems. It is one of those books, which require re-reading only to discern new motifs surfacing up every time. No single review can fully justify the thoughts running throughout the book. I did try jotting down few thoughts but am sure I still have missed some of them, which I might add later after reading it the second time.

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The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg is quite an impressive book. With its umpteen examples of how people defy old habits at the sake of new productive habits and eventually achieve marvelous feat is extremely inspiring. Although the book does not promote or support one secret formula for quickly changing any habit but it makes one think with a different angle. Case studies of corporate success of Alcoa, Starbucks, and P&G’s Febreeze were quite a fascinating read.

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Buddhism Is Not What You Think by Steve Hagen

Simple and free flowing book, Buddhism Is Not What You Think written by Steve Hagen talks about what reality is as per Zen Buddhism. The author resonates one central point in the entire book and that is, reality is about direct experience of the real time than mere feelings and thoughts, which happen to be in constant flux in conscious and subconscious level in human mind.

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Deception Point by Dan Brown and Narration by Richard Poe

Dan Brown knows how to glue readers to his book. His every book is full of surprises with unexpected outcomes and Deception Point is no exception. His description is often marked with vividness, which makes the readers see events than read things. And if the book happens to be an audio version well, then it’s a super awesome combination. Thanks to reado.com for giving me an opportunity to hear a book from one of my favorite authors across the genre of science fiction.

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Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

Thinking, Fast and Slow is a masterpiece written by the Nobel Laureate, Daniel Kahneman; in here, he is targeting human irrationality.  He starts with the book by naming the two parts of a brain as System I and System II, where System I, is the ‘intuition part’, which operates automatically most of the times and is without logic; while System II denotes effortful mental activity, involving logics. It is because of the System I that humans suffer from cognitive biases or the unconscious errors that leads one to jump onto…

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Confession of a Buddhist Atheist by Stephen Batchelor

Confession of a Buddhist Atheist is beautifully woven and presented by Stephen Batchelor in form of a written collage, as he himself mentions at the end of the book. Although the book is in narrative mode yet no where we found it a story presented by the writer in fact, while I was into the book, I felt as if Stephen is talking to me and describing the sequence of his life’s events which led him towards Buddhism and finally his discovery of motif in life.

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A Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nasar

Advanced mathematics coupled with severe mental illness, this is what the book, A Beautiful Mind is about. Sylvia Nasar professor of journalism at Columbia University, has done full justice in surfacing Nash’s life, his youth, college life, his work before and after he earned his doctorate and finally to his breakdown then illness and eventually his recovery. A Beautiful Mind juxtaposes sadness and the will to succeed despondency and depression.

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Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything is a treat to read, I wonder why didn’t I pick it up before. I’am sure am gonna read the sequel as well. Talking about this book, it is divided into six chapters, randomly talking about events and occurrences and then the authors delve back to the nearest probable reason(s) which in most of the cases, hits back to the causes that have been asserted by the respective experts at the times. Deftly, the authors have been able to prove…

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Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki

Rich Dad Poor Dad is a parable presented by American businessman, author and investor Robert Kiyosaki. He talks about the two individuals who inspired and influenced Kiyosaki in his later life, first being his dad the ‘poor dad’ who was a government employee and had a steady flow of salary, while other was his friend Mike’s capitalist father, his ‘rich dad’. Throughout the book, Kiyosaki talks about the different perspectives towards finance, which the poor dad and the rich dad shed on their children in general. One talks in conventional…

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Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

Epigraph on the book claims Jane Eyre to be the romantic novel of the times but I’d like to add, its more than that, it is a web of complex emotions and thoughts being felt and expressed by the protagonist right from the age of nine till the age of twenty. All the ideas and the corresponding events are presented in rhetorical manner, which keeps the reader hooked on with the scenes throughout the novel. The beautiful and though provoking maxims here and there leaves a profound impact into the…

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Surely you’re joking, Mr Feynman by Richard Feynman

Ninety percent of the book talks about mathematics and physics but that is what Mr. Feynman, the top-notch scientist was famous for. The li’l tit-bits of his life are beautifully crafted along with his sense of humor. His love and attitude towards life was quite contagious especially to those who crossed the paths all through his life. The book will make anybody laugh and would have wished, like me, to meet such persona once a lifetime. Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman acknowledges the fact that Richard Feynman was known to…

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Book Review: Many Lives, Many Masters by Dr Brian Weiss

The book is quite a fascinating read, it got me hooked from the beginning till the end. It talks about reincarnation, the theme was depicted in Cloud Atlas as well but the concept of ‘debt’ is quite an innovation. The Bhagavad Gita, a 700-verse Hindu scripture is also known for the same concept. The book, Many Lives, Many Masters talks about 12 past lives of the 86 total lives. It is interesting to see how a skeptic research scholar is drawn towards spirituality and instead of focusing on giving more…

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