Super Strong Artificial Muscles: Interactive Soft Robotics

An Italian team of researchers lead by Prof. Marco Fontana, in collaboration with the departments of Industrial Engineering of the Universities of Trento and Bologna, have created an Electrostatic Bellow Muscle (EBM) to fabricate efficient small-scale robots. The innovative robotic muscle has potential of powering itself for a long period of time beyond its preliminary charge.

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Interview: Professor Sheng Xu, Nanotech Scientist at University of California San Diego

It’s our honour to have Professor Sheng Xu from University of California San Diego with us today. Dr Xu’s research interests focus on the understanding of the electrical and mechanical behaviors of inorganic materials when they are engineered into a soft format; which can further be morphed into soft electronics, nano electronics and energy harvesting/storage devices. He obtained his B.S. in Chemistry and Molecular Engineering from Peking University in Beijing, China in 2006. While he received his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering in 2010 at Georgia Institute of Technology,…

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Tactile Sensation For Soft Robotics: Stretchable Sensor

Sensors that could stretch will pave way towards new intelligent soft systems. Working on the same line of thought Cornell researchers have combined fiber-optic sensor with no so expensive LEDs (light-emitting diode) and dyes. The outcome is a form of a stretchable “skin” that is able to spot topographical distortions like pressure, bending and strain.

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PETase with MHETase Speed Up The Breakdown Of Plastic: Enzyme Innovation

We live in a plastic era. Ubiquitously, the substance is found in our household and communities across the globe. Not only we have filled up our land but also oceans with plastic. Worldwide waste management market size is expected to reach $484.9 billion by 2025 from $303.6 billion in 2017. 

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Electronics Out Of Bacteria: Microbial Physiology

Bacteria – Geobacter, to be more specific – discovered electricity much before than we did. And the interesting part is – ubiquitous, groundwater and also the under the ocean dwelling bacteria takes-in the organic waste and give-out “electrons”. Yes, a tiny electric current is an end product of their exhaling process.

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