Formation of Single Unit by Collision of Multiple Grains: Resurrecting Quasicrystals

Quasicrystal is a form of matter with an unusual arrangement of atoms. Although it’s called a “crystal” but it lacks symmetry. Unlike crystals, pattern within the quasicrystal does not repeat itself. They were first discovered in 1980s and since then the possible atomic arrangements violated the rules that fall under the category of crystals, that is, the materials could have only two-, three-, four- or six-fold symmetry.  

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Nanoscale Thermal Transport: To Prevent Overheating in Electronics

Nano world is full of mysterious features such as uncertainty principle, probabilities and wave function. It’s been at the beginning of quantum mechanics that researchers are working unceasingly to understand the perplexing phenomenon of the nano realm. Unlike the macro world, events at the nano scale are beyond the comprehension of physicists. One such problem is why some uber small heat sources cool down faster if they are packed too close.

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Interview: Professor Sheng Xu, Nanotech Scientist at University of California San Diego

It’s our honour to have Professor Sheng Xu from University of California San Diego with us today. Dr Xu’s research interests focus on the understanding of the electrical and mechanical behaviors of inorganic materials when they are engineered into a soft format; which can further be morphed into soft electronics, nano electronics and energy harvesting/storage devices. He obtained his B.S. in Chemistry and Molecular Engineering from Peking University in Beijing, China in 2006. While he received his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering in 2010 at Georgia Institute of Technology,…

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One Epidermal Patch to track Cardiovascular and Multiple Biomarkers: Wearable Microelectronics

Monitoring cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels together on one tiny wearable patch has always been a far-fetched dream in the nanotech world. Scientists across the globe are still trying to figure it out however, researchers at the University of California San Diego have done something extraordinary in soft, stretchy skin patch.

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Electronics Out Of Bacteria: Microbial Physiology

Bacteria – Geobacter, to be more specific – discovered electricity much before than we did. And the interesting part is – ubiquitous, groundwater and also the under the ocean dwelling bacteria takes-in the organic waste and give-out “electrons”. Yes, a tiny electric current is an end product of their exhaling process.

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Muscles Powered Biohybrid Devices: Robotics with Tissue Engineering

Let’s picture the word, “Robot”, immediately, we get a glimpse of self operating machines, with nuts-and-bolts as building blocks. These machines are permeating all sections of our society. Machine human relationship has crossed the realms of science fiction. In fact, machine learning has become one of the most interesting and sought-after science, sprouting artificial intelligence (AI).

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Micro fish to sense toxins & deliver drugs: 3D printed Nanobots

Nanoengineering experts at the University of California, San Diego, using advanced 3D printed technology have designed micro robots, named as micro fish. As the name suggests these tiny robots are fish shaped and can be used for various functions such as detoxification, sensing toxins and in surgeries assisted by micro robots.

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Rocket that doesn’t require any Fuel: Graphene-powered Spacecraft

Amongst all the amazing properties of graphene, morphing light into action is best of all. Serendipitous discovery of the material had surfaced its remarkable properties like robustness along with high electric and head conduction in flat structure. Yongsheng Chen at Nankai University in Tianjin, China along with his team has been working on to see if the same effect could also be seen on the bigger lattice arrangements of carbon.

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Graphene-based Light Bulbs hitting stores soon: A new era of LED Technology

LED light technology has again hit the spotlight but this time it is due to the wonder material, graphene. Consumers would soon be using graphene-based light bulbs. It is assumed that the dimmable bulb would help in reducing energy costs by ten percent and might come with a longer shelf life relatively. Although, it is expected that the cost might remain the same as is the conventional LED.

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Interview: Wei Gao, Research Scientist at University of California, Berkeley and LBNL

It gives me immense pleasure to introduce today Wei Gao, research scientist at University of California, Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. His research areas include nanomaterials, flexible electronics, micro/nanomachines, nanorobotics, biosensors, electrochemistry, nanomedicine and MEMS.

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