Chameleon Inspired Next-Generation Artificial Camouflage: Biomimicry

To depict natural camouflage characteristics via artificial camouflage at device level has remained a challenge since decades. However, researchers at Seoul National University have developed an artificial camouflage that can adapt and blend with its surroundings. A defense strategy as seen in the case of chameleon that changes its appearance to avoid predators.

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Interview: Dr. Song Chaoyang, Assistant Professor at Southern University of Science and Technology China

Dr. Song Chaoyang is an Assistant Professor, Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) China. His Bionic Design + Learning Lab conducts research in Bionic Design, Robot Learning and Design Science. His team’s vision is to create advanced robotic systems that are sustainable and intelligent.

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Interview: Dr Dylan Drotman, Robotics Engineer at University of California San Diego

It’s our honor to have Dr Dylan Drotman from University of California San Diego with us today. Dr Drotman’s research interests focus on the design, modeling, fabrication, and actuation of physically soft robots that are powered by air or water. He obtained his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at University of California San Diego. He has also been a Guest Lecturer in Experimental Robotics, Soft Robotics and Computer Aided Design & Analysis.

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Super Strong Artificial Muscles: Interactive Soft Robotics

An Italian team of researchers lead by Prof. Marco Fontana, in collaboration with the departments of Industrial Engineering of the Universities of Trento and Bologna, have created an Electrostatic Bellow Muscle (EBM) to fabricate efficient small-scale robots. The innovative robotic muscle has potential of powering itself for a long period of time beyond its preliminary charge.

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Tactile Sensation For Soft Robotics: Stretchable Sensor

Sensors that could stretch will pave way towards new intelligent soft systems. Working on the same line of thought Cornell researchers have combined fiber-optic sensor with no so expensive LEDs (light-emitting diode) and dyes. The outcome is a form of a stretchable “skin” that is able to spot topographical distortions like pressure, bending and strain.

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